National Suicide Prevention Contest

National Suicide Prevention Contest

September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month

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$10,000 Scholarship Contest

The third annual Suicide Prevention Scholarship Contest hosted by Shodair is proud to present this year’s winners! Each winner is awarded $2,500 thanks to the generous donors listed at the bottom of this page.

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Shodair Scholarship Contest Winners

CONGRATULATIONS

VISUAL CATEGORY: MEGAN FRANK – GLENDIVE HIGH SCHOOL

ESSAY CATEGORY: OLIVIA HUBER – HELENA HIGH SCHOOL

VIDEO CATEGORY: QUIN VULK – HELENA CAPITAL HIGH SCHOOL

JUDGE’S CHOICE: LEIAH NELSON – BIGFORK HIGH SCHOOL

Visual Category:

Megan Frank

Glendive High School

MeganFrank

Essay Category:

Olivia Huber

Helena High School

Olivia Huber

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Video Category:

Quin Vulk

Helena Capital High School

Judge’s Choice Category:

Leiah Nelson

Bigfork High School

“Youth suicide rates in Montana are nearly double the national average and we want to do all we can to change that. One first step in suicide prevention and breaking down stigma is creating a safe place for conversations and a platform for young people to share their story. This contest is yet another way we are continuing to meet our mission, to heal, help, and inspire hope with the continued help from our stakeholders. Stigmas prevent people from seeking the help they need, so if we can empower Montana’s youth to speak up, then we’ve done our job.”

-Craig Aasved, CEO of Shodair Children’s Hospital

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

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Let us be the first to say, you’re not alone. Those concerns you’re having – Why is my child so sad? Did I do something wrong? Should I be worried? How do I get him out of his room? Where do I go for help? – they’re normal, and it’s okay to have those questions. It’s also extremely normal for your child or teen to go through seasons of fluctuating emotions, even those that are deeply sad or possibly suicidal. So, take a deep breath – you’re still a good parent and you can get through this. Let’s talk about where to go from here.